Keith Haring

We lost a wonderful artist 25 years ago today. His style and approach to art has inspired artists and designers in all different genres. Here we see how he used his style to create allover prints for interiors as well as textiles. Though his style looks playful and fun, he often included strong messages as evidenced in the mural “Crack is Wack” which he did in 1986. that mural is still there and NYC has renamed the park “Crack is Wack Playground.”

haring

 

Cut Out Art

Back in December we mentioned a few fun things you could do in NYC over the holidays, one of which was the Matisse cut out show at the Museum of Modern Art.

matisse

Matisse called his cut outs “painting with scissors”. He began using this technique after he was diagnosed with cancer. He felt that what in this period of his life constituted his real self; free & liberated. The experimentation with cut-outs offered Matisse innumerable opportunities to fashion a new, aesthetically pleasing environment. As he was bedridden with his illness much of the time he was able to fashion a new, aesthetically pleasing environment: “I have made a little garden all around me where I can walk… There are leaves, fruits, a bird.”

Matisse would cut pieces of paper that he had painted with gouache using a small pair of scissors. He would keep the piece he cut and the scraps for use later. His assistant, Lydia Delectorskaya, would then pin the pieces to the walls with is guidance.

His cutouts, vast in scale (though not always in size), lush and rigorous in color, are among the most admired and influential works of his entire career. They belong with the grandest affirmations of the vital creative force in Western art.

cutouts

Not only did one of our designers, Selina, go see this wonderful show, she was so inspired she used the same technique to with her own artwork. She spent an entire day making these wonderful examples, “you should see the mess I made on my work table,” she said with a smile.

Rubber Duckies Day!!

rubberduck

Today is National Rubber Ducky Day! In 1970, Jim Henson performed the song “Rubber Duckie” as Ernie on Sesame Street, and the rubber duck bath toy has been an iconic American symbol ever since. Rubber ducks have been around since the rise of the rubber industry in the late 1800s, but no one knows their exact origin.

Look at these wonderful images… they’re not photoshopped! That is an actual 85 foot tall rubber duck! Florentijn Hofman is an internationally renown artist from the Netherlands who sculpts huge pieces usually of every day objects, sometimes WITH everyday objects.

His Rubber Duck has traveled the world popping up in cities from Sao Paulo to Auckland, Hong, Sydney and even in Los Angeles for their Tall Ships Festival. How funny is that duck peering over buildings?!

Hofman loves including the public to be involved and they cause passers by to stop and smile. “They give people a break from their daily routines,” he says. “Passers-by stop in front of them, get off their bicycle and enter into conversation with other spectators. People are making contact with each other again. That is the effect of my sculptures in the public domain.”

Click here to look at his other work.